Lifestyle Programs that Represent Specific Identity

Focusing on ‘Over Flowers’ Series

  • Ji-Hee KIM Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul
  • Young-Chan KIM Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to understand how to represent a specific identity through a full textual analysis of the ‘Over flowers’ series (total 8 episodes / 64 times) which is the lifestyle program in Korea such as ‘Over flowers – Grandfather’, ‘Over flowers – Sister’ and ‘Over flowers – Youth’. Textual analysis, one of the qualitative research methods, can be seen as a way to grasp the specific identity of the ‘Over flowers’ series. As a result of the research, ‘Over flowers’ series represents ‘youth’ through longing, affection, and eulogy for youth. The youth that is drawn from the ‘Over flowers’ series is not limited to the age, but it implies a message to look back on me and find a new life, self and realize the politics of life. In the process of representation, the ‘Over flowers’ series induces the cultural codes of youth, friendship, generation, surplus, consideration, empathy and communication to function as the discourse of our society and constitute a specific identity. The ‘Over flowers’ series reminds audience a process of how to relate to each other, how to care, and how the others are being transformed. In other words, the ‘Over flowers’ series attempts to represent the socially structured and commercialized identity. The representation method of ‘Over flowers’ series induces indirect experiences for the audience. Through this, it can be seen the intention to blur the unique identity of the audience and instill idealized self-identity.


KEYWORDS: Specific identity, Lifestyle, ‘Over flowers’ series, Idealized subject

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Published
2018-11-25